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[Clark] [1]     
 

       Sunday May 27th    as we were Setting out this morning two Canoos loaded with Bever elk Deer Skins & Buffalow Robes, from the Mahars [Omaha] nation, they inform that they left that place 2 months, a gentle Breese from the S. E,

 

        

N: 71 W. 3 Miles to a point on the Labd Side opposit the lower point of
[blank] Island, passed a willow Island on the L. Sd opposit
the upper Point of the Isd we Camped on last night
S 82° W 6 ms to a pt: on Lbd Side    passed the lower pt. of a Isd
Passed 4 Casiex [cajeux]  [2] 3 from Grand Osage one form the
Parnees [Pawnees], Passed two Isd. on the S Side a Creek of
20 yrds Wide on the Lb. Side near the upper point,  [3] this
Creek is Called Ash Creek
N 74° W 1 ½ Miles to pt. on Lbd. Sd nearly opst. the upper pt. of the big
Island called [blank] Isle, on the Stbd Side    back of this Isd.
Coms in Otter R & two other Creeks,
S 70° W. 5 M: to a Pt. on St Sd opposit Gasconnade River passing a pt.
on Lbd Side

 

       we camped on an Isd in the mouth of Gasconade R ,  [4] this river is 157 yards wide    a butifull stream of clear water.    19' foot Deep    Hills on the lower Side




[Clark] 
May 27th Sunday 1804
 

       as we were pushing off this Morning two Canoos Loaded with fur &c. Came to from the Mahars [NB: Mahar] nation, [NB: living 730 miles above on the Missouri] which place they had left two months, at about 10 oClock 4 Cajaux or rafts loaded with furs and peltres came too one from the Paunees, [NB: Paunees on the river Platt] the other from Grand Osage,  [5] they informed nothing of Consequence, passed a Creek on the Lbd Side Called ash Creek  [6] 20 yds wide, passed the upper point of a large Island  [7] on the Stbd Side back of which Comes in three Creeks one Called Orter Creek,  [8] her[e] the men  [9] we left hunting Came in    we camped on a Willow Island in the mouth of Gasconnade River. George Shannon Killed a Deer this evening

 

      

Course & Distance 27th May.

 

        

N 71°W.   3 ms to pt. Lbd. Sd.    pd. an Isd.
S 82°W.   6 ms. to pt Lbd. Sd.    pd. 2 Isd. a Creek
N 74°W.   1 ½ ms. to pt Lbd. Sd.    pd. upr. pt by Isd. & 2 Creeks
S. 70°W.   5 ms. to pt. opsd. the Gasconnade R
  15 ½  




[Ordway] 
Sunday May the 27th 1804
 

       passed Ash Creek    high Clifts on S. Side    Arrived at the Mouth of the Gasganade River  [10] at 5 o. C. P. M. on S Side    Shannon killed a Deer  [11]    encamped on an Island opposite to the Mouth of the River, which is a handsome place, the Soil is good, the Country pleasant &C.    arms & ammunition Inspected—




[Floyd] 
 

       Sunday may 27th 1804    pased ash Creek— on the South Side    high Clifts on S Side    arrived at the mouth of the Gasganade Rivber at 5 ock P. m on the South Side    encamped on an Island oppeset the mouth of the River which is a handsom Situation    high hiles on the Left Side    the Bottom is of Good quallity &c.    armes and ammunition Inspected—




[Gass] 
 

       Sunday 27th.    We passed Ash creek where there are high cliffs on the south side, and at five in the afternoon arrived at the mouth of Gaskenade river. On the south side one of our party killed a deer. We encamped for the night on an island opposite the mouth of Gaskenade river. This is a very handsome place,—a rich soil and pleasant country:




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Sunday 27th May 1806.  [12]    a fair morning.    we Set out eairly.    passed a creek called ash Creek, on the N. Side    high clifts on the South Side.    proceeded on    in the afternoon we arived at the Mouth of Gasganade River on South Side, and camped on an Island opposite the mouth of Sd. River.—

 

       Sunday May 27th    This morning we set out early, having fine weather, passed a creek, called Ash Creek, laying on the North side of the River.    On the south side of the River lay high Clifts.    we proceeded on, and in the afternoon we arrived at the Mouth of the Gasconade River; laying on the south side of the Mesouri.    We encamped on an Island opposite the Mouth of said River.    The Gasconade River lies in Latitude 38° 44' 35 North, and course of the River Mesouri being still nearly West.    The Gasconade River is 104 Miles from the River due De Bois (or Wood River) & lies in Latitude 38° 44' 35S North.  [13]




 

1. To the side of this entry and covered by it is a column of barely legible numbers that appear to be the previous day's distances, with a total of 18. (Return to text.)

 

2. Cajeu (plural, cajeux) was a French-Canadian term for a small raft, especially one made by lashing together two canoes. McDermott (GMVF), 41. (Return to text.)

 

3. At this point there is a small sketch under the entry, of document 15, showing a river bend and an island. (Return to text.)

 

4. The Gasconade River enters the Missouri at present Gasconade, Gasconade County, Missouri. MRC map 5; MRM map 13. (Return to text.)

 

5. These men had been trading with the Great (or Grand) Osages, probably on the Osage River in Missouri. (Return to text.)

 

6. Probably later Frame, or Frene, Creek, entering the Missouri at present Hermann, Gasconade County, Mo. . MRC map 5; MRM map 13. (Return to text.)

 

7. Probably L'Outre (more properly la loutre in French) Island. MRC map 5. (Return to text.)

 

8. The literal translation of its early name, Rivière à la Loutre, in Montgomery County, Missouri. Ibid. (Return to text.)

 

9. George Drouillard and John Shields; see above, May 26. (Return to text.)

 

10. Gasconade River at Gasconade, Gasconade County. (Return to text.)

 

11. White-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus. (Return to text.)

 

12. There is no ready explanation for Whitehouse using this later date. It seems inconceivable that he would be rewriting the journal in 1806 and get his dates confused. (Return to text.)

 

13. The latitude and mileage do not appear in the original version of Whitehouse's journal, but they agree with Clark's figures; see Clark's Field Notes entry for August 17, 1804. The sentence appears to have been crowded in between entries. (Return to text.)












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