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[Clark] 
Monday 28th May  [1]
 

       rained hard all the last night    Some wind from the S W, one Deer Killed to day, one Man fell in with Six Indians hunting, onloaded the perogue, & found Several articles Wet, Some Tobacco Spoiled.    river begin to rise




[Clark] 
May 28th Munday 1804 Gasconnade  [2]
 

       Rained hard all last night    Some thunder & lightening hard wind in the forepart of the night from the S W.    Ruben Fields Killed a Deer    Several hunter out to day    I measured the river found the Gasconnade to be 157 yds. wide and 19 foot Deep    the Course of this R. is S 29° W,  [3] one of the hunters fell in with 6 Inds. hunting, onloaded the large Perogue on board of which was 8 french hands    found many things wet by their cearlenessness, put all the articles which was wet out to Dry—    this day So Cloudy that no observations could be taken, the river begin to rise, examine the mens arms and equapage, all in Order




[Ordway] 
 

       Monday May the 28th 1804.    the provisions & cloths put out to air    Several men out hunting &C. Reuben Fields killed a Deer.    the Mouth of the Gasganade River is 157 yards wide—




[Floyd] 
 

       monday may 28th 1804    rain Last night    Severall men went out hunting &c.    one of them Killed a Deer




[Gass] 
 

       Monday 28th.    Our provisions and stores were put out to air and dry, and several of our men sent out to hunt. One  [4] of them killed a deer. The mouth of the Gaskenade river is 157 yards wide.




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Monday 28th May 1804.    a pleasant morning.    Several men out a hunting.    the Latidude at this place is 38° 44' 3 5–10th    as I was a hunting this day I came across a cave on the South Side or fork of a river about 100 yards from the River.    I went a 100 yards under ground.    had no light in my hand if I had, I Should have gone further    their was a Small Spring in it.    it is the most remarkable cave I ever Saw, in my travels.    I returnd to the River    found the boad had gone on and had left the french perogue for me.    I called    they came across for me, and went to camp    took din[ner] and procd. on    the barge had been gone abt. 2 hours.    we went about 2 miles and Camped for the night.

 

       Monday May 28th    This morning being fair I went out hunting with several of our Men, for the day; and on my route I discover'd a Cave on the south side or fork of a small River, about 100 Yards from said fork.    I entered the Cave and proceeded about 100 Yards under the ground, and found from light which came from the 〈top〉 Mouth of the Cave a small spring in it.    I think it one of the most remarkable Caves I ever saw in my travels.    I should have proceeded further into the Cave, but it being dark towards the further end, and having no light, I was forced to return.—    On my arriving at the River I found that Captains Lewis and Clark had proceeded on with the Boat, and had left a pettiauger and some hands waiting for me.    On my hailing them, they came across for me.    We then proceeded to camp, and took dinner, after which we proceeded on with the Pettiauger, the Barge having been gone about two hours, we followed on about two hours; and encamped for that night.




 

1. Under this entry and running into the next is a small sketch on the reverse of document 15. There is also a column of figures under this entry: 3, 4, 1˝, 1˝, 9 and a total of 19. (Return to text.)

 

2. Clark's interlineation, written under the date in Codex A. (Return to text.)

 

3. Biddle apparently has crossed out this passage from "the Course" to here. (Return to text.)

 

4. Reubin Field. (Return to text.)












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