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[Clark] [1]     
 

       July the 2nd 1804    Set out verry early this morning    passd on the Left of the Isles des parques    High butifull Situation—    on the L S. the land indifferent lands    a Creek coms in on the S. S. Called parques,  [2] all at once the river became Crowded with drift that it was dangerous to cross    this I Suppose was from the caveing in of the banks at [t]he head of Some Island above, (3) passed a Creek on the L. S. called Turquie or Turkey Creek  [3]    passed a verry bad Sand bar on the L. S.    the 20 Oars & Poals could with much dificuelty Stem the Current, passed a large Island on the S. S. Called by the Inds. Wau-car-ba war-con-da or the Bear Medison Island,  [4] at 12 oClock came to on the Island and put in a mast, detained four hours, exceedingly hot, wind in forepart of the day from the S. E, George Drewyer informs that the Lands he pass through yesterday & to day on the S. S. was generally Verry fine    he Saw two Springs of fresh water near the Island, Deer Sign has become So Common it is hardly necessary to mention them, we Camped after dark on the S. S. opposit the 1st old Village of the Kanzas which was Situated in a Valley between two points of high land,  [5] on the river back of their village commenced an extensive Prarie 〈the French〉 a large Island in front which appears to have made on that Side and thrown the Current of the river against the place the Village formerly Stood, and washes away the bank in that part. The french formerly had a Fort at this place,  [6] to protect the trade of this nation, the Situation appears to be a verry elligable one for a Town, the valley rich & extensive, with a Small Brook Meanding [meandering] through it and one part of the bank affording yet a good Landing for Boats    The High Lands above the Fere [Fire] river on each Side of the Missouries appear to approach each other much nearer than below that plaice, being from 3 to 6 miles between them, to the Kansas, above that place from 3 to 5 Ms. apart and higher Some places being 160 or 180 feet    the river not So wide    We made a Mast of Cotton wood, 〈yesterday〉 to day in the Course of the evening & night it turned of a butifull red Colour

 

        

N. 22° E W   1 ¼ ms to a pt on the L S. in a bend (1)
N. 10° W   2 ¼ Ms. to a pt. of a little Isd on the S. S.    passed the head
of the Isd.    (2) a Creek L. S
N. 34° E   1 ½ to a pt on L. S.    psd. passed Turkey Creek L. S. (3)
N. 10° W      ½ me. on the L. S.    high land on the S. S.
N. 46 W.   1 ¼ me. on Lbd. S. 〈opsd. Lower pt.〉 of an Isd. (4) on S. S.
S 50 W.—  [7]    To the old village of the Kansas on L. S. pass a Bulge
of Isd.
S 78 W      ½ of a me. to a Pt. on S. S.    psd. 2 runs on S. S.
S. 81° W   2 ¼ mes. to a pt. on the S. S.    passed the head of the Island near opsd. pt.
N. 82° W   2 mes. to a pt. on the S. S.    passed verry Swift water, & Camped
  10 ¼  
N. 53 W  [8]   1 me. alg. S. S.
N 50 W      ¼ me. alg. S. S.
N. 18 E   1 me. to pt. on L. S opsd. an Isd. N. 40° E to Low pt. of
Island 1 ¼ ml.




[Clark] 
 

       July 2nd, 1804    Set out early and proceed on the left of the Islands, two of which are large    a high bottom Situated on the L. S.    passed the mouth of a Creek on the S. S. Called 〈Turquie〉 [NB: Parques]  [9] Creike, at this place I observed that the river was Crouded with Drift wood, and dangerous to pass    as this dead timber Continued only about half an our, I concluded that Some Island of Drift had given way    (3) passed a Creek on the L. S. called Turky Creek, a bad Sand bar on the L. S.    we could with dificuelty Stem the Current with our 20 oars & and all the poles we had, passed a large Island on the S. S. Called by the Indians Wau-car-ba war-cand-da or the Bear Medesin Island, at 12 oClock landed on the Island & put up a mast which detained us four hours—    a verry hot day    winds from the S. E.—    George Drewyer inform's that the Lands he passed through yesterday and to day on the S. S. was verry fine, few Springs, we Camped after dark on the S. S. above the Island & opposit the 1st old village of the Kanzes which was Situated in a valley, between two points of high Land, and imediatly on the river bank, back of the village and on a riseing ground at about one mile    The French had a garrison for Some time and made use of water out of a Spring running into Turkey Creek. an extensive Prarie, as the Current of the river Sets against the banke and washes it away the landing place for Boats is indifferent—    The high lands above the Fire river, approaches nearer each than below, being from 3 to 6 miles distant and above Kansas from 3 to 5 miles distant and the Hills at Some places are from 160 to 180 feet above the bottom

 

        

Course and distance & reffersns. July 2d

N. 22° W.   1 ¼ ms. to a pt. on L. S. in a bend (1)
N. 10° W   2 ¼ ms. to a pt. of a Lit: Isd. on S. S.    passd. Isd. (2)
N. 34° E   1 ½ ms. to a pt. on L. S.    psd. Turkey Cr: (3)
N. 10° W      ½ on the L. S. High Lds. on S. S.
N. 46 W.   1 ¼ ms. on S. S. of an Isd. on S. S. (4)
S. 87 W,      ½ Me. on S. S. a point    psd. a run
S. 81° W   2 ¼ mes. on S. S.    psd. head of Island
N. 82 W   2 ms. on the L. S.    psd. Swift water
  11 ½ 1st old village Kansas




[Ordway] 
 

       Monday July 2nd 1804.    we Set out verry early this morning    passed a High beautiful Situation on the South Side of the river, a Creek Comes in on the North Side called parques or fence Creek or River, we passed a Creek on the South Side called Turquie or Turkey Creek, we Delayed at 12 o.C. for to put up a Temperary mast as the wind was fair, we passed a prarie on the South Side of the River called the old Village of the Kansars &C.  [10]    we passed Several Islands. Several Deer killed this day, we camped  [11] on the North Side of the River    Our flanking party did not Join us at night




[Floyd] 
 

       Monday July 2d    Set out verry early this morning    passed on the Left of the Isd. parque &c    High butifule Situation on the South Side the Land    indifferent Lands    a Creek Comes in on the 〈So〉 N Side called parkques Creek    passed a creek on the N—Side called Turkey Creek    High Landes    came 10 miles    campt on the N Side, 〈on the South Side was a old French fort in former times the old Kansas village on the Back of this village in High Hills of Prarae Land T〉 on the South Side was a old French fort who had Setled hear to protect the Trade of this nation in the valley    the Kansas Had a village between tow pints of High 〈Lands〉 Praria Land    a Handsom Situation for a town




[Gass] 
 

       Monday 2nd.    At sunrise we continued our voyage, and met a quantity of drift wood which was carried down the stream; this morning we passed a creek on the south side and encamped on the north opposite an old French village and fort, but all vacant.




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Monday 2nd    Got on Our way at Green Island at 4 Oclock P. M., the water was Strong    passd a prarie on the west S. at Sd place Crossing the [river] at Sd. place the Boat Swong the [page torn]    Exerted them selves mighty well [page torn]    off halted and got a mast [page torn]    the Barge    Roed. 10½ Miles [page torn]    the head of Ordaways  [12] [page torn]

 

       Monday July 2nd    This morning we left Green Island, at 4 oClock A. M.  [13]    Found the water to run very strong against us    we passed a Priari lying on the So West side of the River, we crossed the River at this Priari, and in so doing the boat swung and got aground, but by the exertion of the Men she got off.    we halted and got a Mast for our boat & We encamped in the Evening at the head of Ordaways Island, having rowed this day 10½ Miles.




 

1. Biddle's notation at the top of this sheet of the Field Notes (document 26) reads "July 2 to 5." (Return to text.)

 

2. Probably Bee Creek, in Platte County, Missouri, whose mouth has perhaps shifted upstream over the years. Nicollet labels it both "Bee Creek" and "Parc Creek? (L. & C.)"; he was probably using Biddle's text as a reference. Nicollet (MMR), 371; MRC map 15. (Return to text.)

 

3. Perhaps Corral Creek, in Leavenworth County, Kansas. MRC map 15. (Return to text.)

 

4. Nicollet gives it as "Wasabe Wakandege Island," evidently later Kickapoo Island, north of Fort Leavenworth, Leavenworth County. Robert L. Rankin gives the Omaha name as wasábe wakká A with ogonek lowercase symboĺdaki, "the spirit black bear." Nicollet (MMR), 372; MRC map 15. (Return to text.)

 

5. The "Village" in Nicollet is in the right location, in extreme northeast Leavenworth County, to be the old Kansa village. It is apparently where the Kansa Indians were living in the Salt Creek locale in the 1740s and 1750s. From here they moved west into the lower reaches of the Kansas River. Nicollet (MMR), 372; Wedel (KA), 51. The camp was near present Weston, Platte County, Missouri. MRC map 16. (Return to text.)

 

6. Fort de Cavagnial, or Cavagnolle, named after the French governor of Louisiana, was founded in 1744 and abandoned in 1764, when Louisiana was transferred from France to Spain. It is the "fort & trading establishment" mentioned by Clark in his notebook journal on July 1. It was in Leavenworth County, perhaps three miles north of present Fort Leavenworth, and was built to control the trade with the Kansa and Osage Indians and perhaps to promote trade with the Spanish in New Mexico. Hoffhaus; Barry, 22–23; Mathews, 218–19. (Return to text.)

 

7. This course does not appear in Codex A, and there are other discrepancies, including the final mileage total for the day. (Return to text.)

 

8. These three courses and distances, immediately under those for July 2, were evidently the first ones for July 3. Clark repeats them in full in the appropriate place under that date, but there are discrepancies. (Return to text.)

 

9. Clark made a mistake here and Biddle later interlined the correction. "Parques" Creek came first, then Turkey Creek. See nn. 2 and 3, above. (Return to text.)

 

10. The Kansa, or Kaw, Indians lived in this locale in the 1740s and 1750s. (Return to text.)

 

11. Near Weston, Platte County,. (Return to text.)

 

12. Ordway's Island, as the fair copy makes clear, but no one else, including Ordway, uses the name. Evidently this is Clark's "Wau-car-ba war-con-da" Island, probably later Kickapoo Island, north of Fort Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kansas. The camp was near Weston, Platte County, Missouri. (Return to text.)

 

13. There is an erasure on the "A," but it is clearly that letter. (Return to text.)












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