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[Lewis] 
Wednesday May 22cd 1805.
 

       The wind blew so violently this morning that we did not think it prudent to set out untill it had in some measure abated; this did not happen untill 10 A. M. when we proceeded principally by the toe lines    the bottoms somewhat wider than usual, the lands fertile or apparently so tho' the short grass and the scantey proportion of it on the hills would indicate no great fertility.    passed Windy Island on Lard. at 1 M.    5½ miles above passed a large Island in a bend on Stard. side, and three miles further on the same side passed the entrance of grows Creek 20 yds wide, affords but little water.  [1]    this creek we named from seeing a number of the pointed tail praire hen near it's mouth,  [2]    these are the fist we have seen in such numbers for some days. I walked on shore this morning    the country is not so broken as yesterday tho' still high and roling or wavy; the hills on Lard. side possess more pine than usual; some also on the Stard. hills. Salts and other mineral appearances as usual.    the river continues about the same width or from 200 to 250 yds. wide, fewer sandbars and the courant more gentle and regular; game not so abundant as below the Muscle Shell river. I killed a deer in the course of my walk today. Capt. C. also walked out this evening and took a view of the country from a conspicuous point and found it the same as has been discribed.    we have caught but few fish since we left the Mandans, they do not bite freely, what we took were the white cat of 2 to 5 lbs.  [3] I presume that fish are scarce in this part of the river. We encamped earlyer this evening  [4] than usual in order render the oil of a bear which we killed. I do not believe that the Black bear common to the lower part of this river and the Atlantic States, exists in this quarter;  [5] we have neither seen one of them nor their tracks which would be easily distinguished by it's shortness of tallons when compared with the brown grizly or white bear. I believe that it is the same species or family of bears which assumes all those colours at different ages and seasons of the year.—  [6]

 

        

Courses and distances May 22cd 1805.  [7]

S. 30° E. To the lower point of an Island situated in a bend on Lard.
side

     ¼
West Along the Stard. side passing the upper point of the Island
at ¾ of a mile high land Ld.

  3
S. 70° W. to a point of woodland on the Stard. passing under a bluff
on Lard. opposite to an Island in a bend to the Stard.

  3 ¼
N. 45° W. To a point of timber on the Lard. side   2
West To the mouth of a creek on the Stard. side in a deep bend
to the Stard.

  1
South To a point of high wood on Stard. passing a Lard. point at
½ m. and over a willow bar from Std.

  1 ½
S. 65° W. Along the Stard. point, opposite to a bluff on Lard. cov-
ered with pine

     ¼
West To a point of woodland on the Lard. side opposite to a
bluff

  1
S. 30° W. To a willow point on the Stard. side   2
S. 60° W. To a point of woodland on Stard. side, where we en-
camped; a bluff opposite

  2 ¼
 
Miles—
16 ½




[Clark] 
May 22nd Wednesday 1805
 

       The wind Continued to blow So violently hard we did not think it prudent to Set out untill it luled a little, about 10 oClock we Set out    the morning Cold, passed a Small Island in the bend to the Lard Side, & proceeded on    at 5 miles higher passed a Island in a bend to the Stard Side, and a Creek a Short distance above on the Stard Side 20 yds. w    Capt Lewis walked out before dinner & Killed a Deer, I walked out after dinner and assended & but a few miles to view the Countrey, which I found roleing & of a verry rich Stickey Soil produceing but little vegitation of any kind except the prickley-piar, but little grass & that verry low.    a great deal of Scattering Pine on the Lard Side & Some fur on the Stard. Sd. The mineral productions as described in the proceeding days, game no So abundant as below, the river Continue about the Same width, fewer Sand bars & current more regular, river falls about an inch a day

 

       We camped on the Stard. Side, earlier than we intend on account of Saveing the oil of a bear which the party killed late this afternoon.

 

        

  mile   Course & Distance May 22nd 1805
S. 30° E.      ¼ to the lower point of an Island Situated in a bend to the
Lard Side
West   3 allong the Stard. Side passed the upper point of the Island
at ¾ a high land on L. S.
S. 70° W.   3 ¼ to a point of wood land on the Stard. passing under a
bluff Lard. opposit an Island in a bend to the Stard. Side
N. 45° W.   2 to a point of timber on the Lard. Side
West   1 to the mouth of a Creek on the Std. Side in a Deep bend
to the Stard. Side
South   1 ½ to a point of high wood on Stard Side passed Lard pt. &
over a willow bar from Std.
S. 65° W.      ¼ allong the Stard. point opposit a Bluff Covered with pine
on the Lard Side
West   1 to a point of woodland on the Lard. Side opposit to a bluff
S. 30° W.   2 to a willow point on the Stard. Side
S. 60° W.   2 ¼ to a point of wood land on Stard. side opposit a bluff.    we
encamped
  16 ½  

 

       Maney of the Creeks which appear to have no water near ther mouths have Streams of running water higher up which rise & waste in the Sand or gravel.    the water of those Creeks are So much impregnated with the Salt Substance that it cannot be Drank with pleasure.




[Ordway] 
 

       May 22nd Wednesday 1805.    the wind continued to blow So violently hard we did not think it prudent to Set out untill it luled a little    about 11 oClock we Set out    the [morning] cold.    passed a Small Island in the bend of the river to the Lard. Side, and proceeded on    at 5 miles higher passed a Isld in a bend to the Stard. Side & a creek  [8] a Short distance [above] on the Stard. Side    Capt. Lewis walked on Shore and killed a deer in the fore part of the day, after dinner Capt. Clark walked out a fiew miles to view the Country, which he found verry rich Soil produceing but little vigitation of any kind except the prickly pairs    but little grass & that verry low.    a great deal of Scatering pine on the Lard. Side & Some fiew on the Stard. Side.    the mineral production as described yesterday or in the proceeding days.    the game not So a bundant as below    the river continues about the Same width.    a fiew Sand bars, and current more regular. River falls about an Inch a day, we Camped on the Stard Side eairlier than we intended on account of Saveing the oil of a yallow bear which the party killed late this afternoon. Came 16½ miles to day.—

 

       Many of the creeks which appear to have no water near their mouths have Streams of running water high up which rise & waste in the Sand or gravel    the water of those creeks are so much impregnated with the Salt Substance that it cannot be drank with pleasantness.—




[Gass] 
 

       Wednesday 22nd.    A cloudy morning. The wind blew so hard this morning, we did not get under way until 9 o'clock. The forenoon was cold and disagreeable, but the afternoon became more pleasant. We killed a brown bear and some other game on our way. Having gone 16⅓ miles we encamped on the North side.




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Wednesday 22nd May 1805.    the wind blew hard all last night (caught 2 beaver last night) and continues blowing this morning, Cloudy.    about 11 oC. A. M. the wind abated So that we Set off and proceeded on    passed a Small Island near N. S. and one Near the S. Side.    the River hills make near the River.    passed black bluffs    the pitch pine close along Sd. bluffs to the bank of the River.    passed a Creek  [9] on the N. S.    we wounded a brown bear in the River.    (abt. 2 oC. we) halted to dine at a handsom timbred bottom on the N. S.    a cold chilly day.    towards evening Some of the hunters killed a large brown bear.    we Saved the Skin & greese.    we Camped on the N. S.    Came 16½ Miles to day.    Sergt. Ordway and one of the hunters killed a large buffaloe.

 

       Wednesday May 22nd    The wind continued blowing hard, all last night which was the case in the Morning till about 11 o'Clock A. M. when it abated, We then set off, and proceeded on our Voyage; and passed Two small Islands, one laying near the North & the other near the South side of the River, the Hills making in, near the River, and black bluffs, [crossed out, illegible] with Pitch pine Trees growing close along those bluffs, to the bank of the River, We likewise passed a Creek lying on the North side of the River, where one of the Hunters that was out wounded a brown bear, but we did not get him—    he was in the River and made his escape.—    At 2 o'Clock P. M. we stopped to dine at a Handsome piece of Timbered bottom land, lying on the North side of the River; the day was chilly and Cold, towards Evening some of our hunters killed a large brown Bear, which they brought to us, We halted here to Skin & get the Oil of this animal & One of our hunters killed a large Buffalo; We encamped on the North side of the River & came 16½ Miles this day.—




 

1. The large island is probably later Fort Island. Grouse Creek is probably later Beauchamp Creek in Phillips County, Montana. Although MRC map 69 shows a Grouse Creek farther on, it does not fit with the captains' courses and distances. Atlas maps 39, 51, 59. (Return to text.)

 

2. The sharp-tailed grouse. (Return to text.)

 

3. The white cat were channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. Lee et al., 446. (Return to text.)

 

4. In Phillips County, just below present CK, or Kannuck, Creek (Lewis and Clark's Teapot Creek of May 23). Atlas maps 39, 51, 59; MRC map 69. (Return to text.)

 

5. Lewis was not, in fact, beyond the range of the black bear. Burroughs, 52–53. (Return to text.)

 

6. This sentence refers to the grizzly bear, which does indeed vary greatly in color, though it does not change with the seasons. See below, May 15 and 31, 1806. (Return to text.)

 

7. Also given on Atlas map 39, in both captains' hands. (Return to text.)

 

8. The party's Grouse Creek, now probably Beauchamp Creek, Phillips County, Montana. The party camped below their Teapot Creek, which they passed the next day. (Return to text.)

 

9. Grouse Creek to the party, now probably Beauchamp Creek, Phillips County, Montana. (Return to text.)












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