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[Clark] 
October 6th 〈Saturday〉 Sunday 1805
 

       A cool morning    wind East for a Short time, which is always a Cool Wind, had a cash made for our Saddles and buried them on the Side of a Pond. [one word, illegible] 〈of the Inds.〉

 

        

Magnetic azmuth of Sun A M—

Time
     
azmth.
     
[ML: altitude] 〈distance〉
H.    m.   S                
9      6    27      
S. 75° E
     
42°    58'    00"
9    18    21      
S. 73  E
     
45     46     45

 

       finish all the Canoes late. I am verry Sick all night, Pane in Stomach & the bowels oweing to my diet

 

        

Equal altitudes 6th Septr. [October] with Sextent

  H.    m.    S.     H.    M    S
A M 9    16    21.5       P M. 3    45    34.5
  "     18    20.5     "     47    34.5
  "     20    17.5     "     49    26.5

 

       Altitude produced 45° 46' 45"—

 

       Took time and distance of moons Western Limb and Alpha symbol Arquile, Star West—

 

        

 
Time
     
distance
  H.   M.    S.   d
P M 8    25    55   58    54'   15"
  "     28    34    "      55    30
  "     32    47    "      56    45
  "     34    40    "      57      0
  "     36    53    "      57    45
  "     38    41    "      58    30
  "     40    35    "      59    15
  "     42    14    "      59    45
  "     43    37   59      1    00
  "     45    21    "        1    45

 

      Took time and Distance of Moons 〈Western〉 [ML: Western] Limb from Alberian, Star East

 

        

Time
     
Distance
h.   m     S.    
9      9    52   65°   29'   15"
"    12      6    "      28      "
"    13    47    "        2    15
"    16      8    "      27    15
"    18      2    "      28      "
"    19    49    "      24    30
"    21    12    "      24      "
"    22    44    "      23    30




[Clark] 
October 6th 〈Saturday〉 Sunday 1805
 

       A Col Easterley wind which Spring up in the latter part of the night and Continues untill about 7 or 8 oClock A. M.    had all our Saddles Collected a whole dug and in the night buried them, also a Canister of powder and a bag of Balls at the place the Canoe which Shields made was cut from the body of the tree—    The Saddles were buried on the Side of a bend about ½ a mile below—    all the Canoes finished this evening ready to be put into the water. I am taken verry unwell with a paine in the bowels & Stomach, which is certainly the effects of my diet—which last all night—.  [1]

 

       The winds blow cold from a little before day untill the Suns gets to Some hight from the Mountans East as they did from the mountans at the time we lay at the falls of Missouri from the West

 

       The river below this forks is Called Kos kos kee  [2] it is Clear rapid with Shoals or Swift places—

 

       The open Countrey Commences a fiew miles below This on each side of the river, on the Lard Side below the 1st Creek.    with a few trees Scattered near the river.




[Ordway] 
 

       Sunday 6th Oct 1805.    a pleasant morning.    a hole or carsh dug hide our pack Saddles in.    we got oars and poles ready.    towards evening we got the other canoes ready to put in the river. Some gig poles got ready.    an Indian raft seen floating down the koskoskia River.    one of the men killed two ducks.    after night burryed the pack Saddles &C.—




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Sunday 6th Oct. 1805.    a clear pleasant morning.    we continued on with the other canoes, & a carch or hole dug to berry our pack Saddles in.    we got poles & oars ready    towards evening we got the other Canoes ready to put in the water.    Some gig poles prepared &c.    a raft Seen floating down the River with Several Indians on it.    one of the men killed 2 ducks.    berryed the pack Saddles and Some Ammunition &c.—

 

       Sunday October 6th    A clear pleasant morning, we continued the party working on the Canoes, and dug a Cashe or hole to bury our pack Saddles in, & made oars & poles for our Canoes.    Towards evening, we got the other Canoes ready to put in the Water & prepar'd some Gig poles &ca    We saw a raft floating down the River which had several Indians on it.    One of our party went out with his Rifle & killed 2 Ducks which he brought to our Camp.    We finished digging the Cashe or hole, & deposited our pack saddles & some Ammunition in it.—    Our Men that had been sick for some time past, had nearly all got their healths, & are fit to do their duty again    We are all in high spirits expecting we shall be able to descend the River tomorrow.    This place we named Canoe Camp and lies in Latitude 46° 34' 56 2/10 North Latitude.—




 

1. Clark's astronomical observation here in Codex G, pp. 138–39, repeats the table found in the Elkskin-bound Journal; it is not printed here. (Return to text.)

 

2. The Clearwater River. Later the adopted the spelling "Kooskooskee." There are different explanations of the name; sources differ as to whether it is the Nez Perce name for the river. A common version is that koos keich keich means "clear water." Josephy (NP), 5; Space, 8. Or it may represent the Nez Perce term qu·sqú·s, "blue gray." (Return to text.)












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