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[Clark] 
November 12th Tuesday 1805
 

       a tremendious thunder Storm abt. 3 oClock this morning accompanied by wind from the S W. and Hail, this Storm of hard Clap's thunder Lighting and hail until about 6 oClock at intervals    it then became light for a Short time when the heavens became darkined by a black Cloud from the S, W, & a hard rain Suckceeded which lasted untill 12 oClock with a hard wind which raised the Seas tremendiously high braking with great force and fury against the rocks & trees on which we lie, as our Situation became Seriously dangerous, we took the advantage of a low tide & moved our Camp around a point a Short distance to a Small wet bottom at the mouth of a Small Creek, which we had not observed when we first Came to this Cove, from its being very thick and obscured by drift trees & thick bushes, Send out men to hunt    they found the woods So thick with Pine & [decay?] timber and under groth that they could not get through, Saw Some Elk tracks, I walked up this creek & killed 2 Salmon trout, the men killd. 13 of the Salmon Species, The Pine of fur Specs, or Spruc Pine grow here to an emense Size & hight maney of them 7 & 8 feet through and upwards of 200 feet high. It would be distressing to a feeling person to See our Situation at this time all wet and cold with our bedding &c. also wet, in a Cove Scercely large nough to Contain us, our Baggage in a Small holler about ˝ a mile from us, and Canoes at the mercy of the waves & drift wood, we have Scured them as well as it is possible by Sinking and wateing them down with Stones to prevent the emence [waves] dashing them to pices against the rocks—    one got loose last night & was left on a rock by the tide Some distance below without recving much damage. fortunately for us our Men are helthy. It was clear at 12 for a Short time. I observed the Mountains on the opposit Side was covered with Snow— our party has been wet for 〈Seven Six〉 8 days and is truly disagreeable, their robes & leather Clothes are rotten from being Continually wet, and they are not in a Situation to get others, and we are not in a Situation to restore them—    I observe great numbers of Sea guls, flying in every derection—    Three men Gibson Bratten & Willard attempted to decend in a Canoe built in the Indian fashion and abt. the Size of the one the Indians visited us in yesterday, they Could not proceed, as the waves tossed them about at will, they returned after proceeding about 1 mile—    we got our Selves tolerable Comfortable by drying our Selves & bedding Cought 3 salmon this evining in a Small branch above about 1 mile




[Clark] 
November 12th Tuesday 1805
 

       A Tremendious wind from the S. W. about 3 oClock this morning with Lightineng and hard claps of Thunder, and Hail which Continued untill 6 oClock a. m. when it became light for a Short time, then the heavens became Sudenly darkened by a black Cloud from the S. W. and rained with great violence untill 12 oClock, the waves tremendious brakeing with great fury against the rocks and trees on which we were encamped. our Situation is dangerous.    we took the advantage of a low tide and moved our camp around a point to a Small wet bottom at the mouth of a Brook, which we had not observed when we Came to this cove; from it being verry thick and obscured by drift trees and thick bushes    It would be distressing to See our Situation, all wet and Colde our bedding also wet, (and the robes of the party which Compose half the bedding is rotten and we are not in a Situation 〈not〉 to supply their places) in a wet bottom Scercely large enough to contain us, 〈with〉 our baggage half a mile from us and Canoes at the mercy of the waves, altho Secured as well as possible, Sunk with emence parcels of Stone to wate them down to prevent their dashing to pieces against the rocks; one got loose last night and was left on a rock a Short distance below, without rciving more dammage than a Split in her bottom—    Fortunately for us our men are healthy. 3 men Gibson Bratten & Willard attempted to go aroud the point below in our Indian Canoe, much Such a canoe as the Indians visited us in yesterday, they proceeded to the point from which they were oblige to return, the waves tossing them about at will    I walked up the branch and giged 3 Salmon trout.    the party killed 13 Salmon to day in a branch about 2 miles above. rain Continued




[Ordway] 
 

       Tuesday 12th Nov. 1805.    a hard Storm continued all last night, and hard Thunder lightning and hail this morning    we Saw a mountain  [1] on the opposite Shore covred with Snow.    the rain continued hard all day.    we moved our Camp a Short distance further up the River to the mouth of a creek and got a more comfortable Camp.    we giged Several more Trout in this creek.




[Gass] 
 

       Tuesday 12th.    A cloudy wet morning, after a terrible night of rain, hail, thunder and lightening. We thought it best to move our camp, and fixed our canoes and loaded them with stones to keep them down. We went about the eighth of a mile from this place, and fixed ourselves as well as we could, and remained all night. The rain still continued, and the river remained very rough.




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Tuesday Novemr 12th    We had a hard storm the greater part of last night, & hard thunder, lightning, & hail this morning.    We saw a high mountain which lay on the opposite to where we are encamped covered with snow.    The Rain continued hard during the most part of this day.    We were employed in putting Stones in our Canoes to ballast them.    Towards evening we moved our Canoes & Camp a short distance up the River; to the mouth of a creek; where our men gigged several more fine Salmon Trout.




 

1. Perhaps Mt. Hood, some distance to the southeast in Hood River County, Oregon. (Return to text.)












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