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[Clark] 
November 27th Wednesday 1805
 

       Some rain all the last night & this morning    at day light 3 Canoes and 11 men Came down with roots meat, Skins &c. to Sill, they asked Such high prices we were unable to purchase any thing, and as we were about Setting out, discovered that one of those Indians had Stole an ax, we Serched and found it under the roabe of one man whome we Shamed verry much

 

       we proceeded on, around Point William  [1]    th Swells became high and rained so hard we Concluded to halt and dry our Selves,  [2] Soon after our landing the wind rose from the East and blew hard accompanied with rain, this rain obliged us to unload & draw up our Canoes, one of which was Split to feet before we got her out of the river, this place the Peninsolely is about 50 yards and 3 miles around this point of Land.    water Salt below not Salt above.




[Clark] 
Wednesday 27th November 1805
 

       Rained all the last night and this morning it Continues moderately— at day light 3 Canoes and 11 Indians Came from the Village with roots mats, Skins &c. to Sell, they asked Such high prices that we were unable to purchase any thing of them, as we were about to Set out missed one of our axes which was found under an Indians roab    I smamed [NB: Shamed] this fellow verry much and told them they should not proceed with us—    we proceded on between maney Small Islands passing a Small river  [3] of [blank] yds wide which the Indians Call—[NB: Kekemar〈qu〉ke] and around a verry remarkable point which projects about 1˝ Miles directly towards the Shallow bay    the isthmus which joins it to the main land is not exceding 50 yards and about 4 Miles around.    we call this Point William

 

       below this point the waves became So high we were Compelled to land unload and traw up the Canoes, here we formed a Camp on the neck of Land which joins Point William to the main at an old indian hut. The rain Continued hard all day we are all Wet and disagreeable.    one Canoe Split before we Got her out of the Water 2 feet—    The water at our Camp Salt that above the isthmus fresh and fine—




[Ordway] 
 

       Wednesday 27th Nov. 1805.    rained all last night. Several Indians came from the village to trade their wapetoes roots with us.    we went on across a bay then turned a cape & where we could perceive a considerable of current in the River    we went on about one mile further    the waves ran So high that obledged us to halt at an old fishery.  [4]    hard rain.




[Gass] 
 

       Wednesday 27th.    We set out early in a wet morning; coasted round, and turned a sharp cape  [5] about a mile; when we found the swells running so high that we had to halt, unload our canoes, and haul them out on the shore. Here we remained the afternoon, and had a very wet night.  [6]




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Wednesday Novemr. 27th    A rainey wet morning & cold.    We set out early and coasted along shore round a large Bay.    we then turned a Sharp Cape,  [7] & went about one Mile; where the Swell ran so high, that it became dangerous for us to proceed on.    We halted at an old fishing camp,  [8] where we unloaded our Canoes & hawled them up on the Shore.—    The Rain continued hard all this day.—




 

1. Presumably after William Clark; present Tongue Point, Clatsop County, Oregon. Atlas maps 82, 92. (Return to text.)

 

2. On the west side of the neck of Tongue Point, in Clatsop County, just east of present Astoria. The majority of the party under Clark remained here until December 7, while Lewis and five men scouted for a suitable wintering camp. Atlas maps 82, 92. (Return to text.)

 

3. Present John Day River, in Clatsop County; "Ke ke mar que Creek" on Atlas maps 81, 82. The term is from the Chinook language; its phonetic form is uncertain but may be kigimax̣ix. The river should not be confused with the larger John Day River (Lewis and Clark's River La Page; see above, October 21, 1805), reaching the Columbia between Sherman and Gilliam counties, Oregon. Both were named for an Astorian who went insane during the overland journey of 1811–12. Coues (HLC), 2:655 n. 2. (Return to text.)

 

4. The party moved along the shore and crossed the neck of Tongue Point, the group's Point William, to its west side and camped there, east of Astoria, Clatsop County, Oregon. Most of the party, including Ordway, would remain here until December 7, while Lewis and several men sought a winter camp. (Return to text.)

 

5. The captains called it Point William, probably after Clark; it is now Tongue Point, Clatsop County, Oregon. (Return to text.)

 

6. On the west side of the neck of Tongue Point, Clatsop County, just east of Astoria. Most of the party would remain here under Clark until December 7. (Return to text.)

 

7. The captains called it Point William, probably after Clark; it is now Tongue Point, Clatsop County, Oregon. (Return to text.)

 

8. On the west side of the neck of Tongue Point, Clatsop County, just east of Astoria. Most of the party would remain here under Clark until December 7. (Return to text.)












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