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[Clark] 
November 28th Thursday 1805
 

       Wind Shifted about to the S. W. and blew hard accompanied with hard rain all last night, we are all wet bedding and Stores, haveing nothing to keep our Selves or Stores dry, our Lodge nearly worn out, and the pieces of Sales & tents So full of holes & rotten that they will not keep any thing dry, we Sent out the most of the men to drive the point for deer, they Scattered through the point; Some Stood on the pensolu, we Could find no deer, Several hunters attempts to penetrate the thick woods to the main South Side without Suckcess, the Swan & gees wild and Cannot be approached, and wind to high to go either back or forward, and we have nothing to eate but a little Pounded fish which we purchasd. at the Great falls, This is our present Situation,! truly disagreeable.    aded to this the robes of our Selves and men are all rotten from being Continually wet, and we Cannot precure others, or blankets in their places.    about 12 oClock the wind Shifted about to the N. W and blew with great violence for the remainder of the day    at maney times it blew for 15 or 20 minits with Such vilence that I expected every moment to See trees taken up by the roots, Some were blown down. Those Squals were Suckceeded by rain,    !O how Tremendious is the day. This dredfull wind and rain Continued with intervales of fair weather, the greater part of the evening and night.




[Clark] 
Thursday 28th November 1805
 

       Wind Shifted about to the S. W. and blew hard accompanied with hard rain.    rained all the last night    we are all wet our bedding and stores are also wet, we haveing nothing which is Sufficient to keep ourselves bedding or Stores dry    Several men in the point hunting deer without Suckcess, the Swan and brant which are abundant Cannot be approached Sufficently near to be killed, and the wind and waves too high to proceed on to the place we expect to find Elk, & we have nothing to eate except pounded fish which we brought from the Great falls, this is our present Situation; truly disagreeable.    about 12 oClock the wind Shifted around to the N W. and blew with Such violence that I expected every moment to See trees taken up by the roots, maney were blown down. This wind and rain Continued with Short intervales all the latter part of the night. O! how disagreeable is our Situation dureing this dreadful weather.




[Ordway] 
 

       Thursday 28th Nov. 1805.    a hard Storm.    the wind high from the N. West. Several men went out to hunt the but killed nothing    hard rain all day—




[Gass] 
 

       Thursday 28th.    We had a wet windy morning; some of the hunters went out, but had no luck. It rained all day; and we had here no fresh water, but what was taken out of the canoes as the rain fell.




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Thursday Novemr 28th    We had a very heavy Storm during the whole of last night, & the wind blowing hard from the Westward this morning.    Several Men of our party turned out to hunt.    It rained the greater part of this day.    The hunters returned, not having killed any kind of game.    They mentioned that they had found the Country very broken, & so thicketty that it was impossible to hunt in it.    The Wind rose from the North West & became a perfect storm













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