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[Lewis] 
Friday January 3d 1806.
 

       At 11 A. M. we were visited by our near neighbours, Chief or Tiá,  [1] Co-mo-wool; alias Conia and six Clatsops.    the[y] brought for sale some roots buries and three dogs also a small quantity of fresh blubber.    this blubber they informed us they had obtained from their neighbours the Callamucks  [2] who inhabit the coast to the S. E. near whose vilage a whale had recently perished.    this blubber the Indians eat and esteeme is excellent food.    our party from necessaty have been obliged to subsist some length of time on dogs have now become extreemly fond of their flesh; it is worthy of remark that while we lived principally on the flesh of this anamal we were much more healthy strong and more fleshey than we had been since we left the Buffaloe country.    for my own part I have become so perfectly reconciled to the dog that I think it an agreeable food and would prefer it vastly to lean Venison or Elk.    a small Crow,  [3] the blue crested Corvus and the smaller corvus with a white brest,  [4] the little brown ren,  [5] a large brown sparrow,  [6] the bald Eagle and the beatifull Buzzard of the columbia still continue with us.—    Sent Sergt. Gass and George shannon to the saltmakers who are somewhere on the coast to the S. W. of us, to enquire after Willard and Wiser who have not yet returned. Reubin Fields Collins and Pots the hunters who set out on the 26th [EC?: 28] Ulto. returned this evening after dark.    they reported that they had been about 15 Miles up the river at the head of the bay just below us and had hunted the country from thence down on the East side of the river, even to a considerable distance from it and had proved unsuccessful having killed one deer and a few fowls, barely as much as subsisted them.    this reminded us of the necessity of taking time by the forelock,  [7] and keep out several parties while we have yet a little meat beforehand.— I gave the Chief Commowooll a pare of sattin breechies with which he appeared much pleased.—




[Clark] 
January 3rd Friday 1806
 

       The Sun rose fair this morning for the first time for Six weeks past, the Clouds Soon obscure it from our view, and a Shower of rain Suckceeded— last night we had Sharp lightening a hard thunder Suckceeded with heavy Showers of hail, and rain, which Continud with intervales of fair moon Shine dureing the night. Sent out Sergt. Gass & 2 men to the Salt makers with a vew to know what is the Cause of the delay of 2 of our party Willard & Wiser who we are uneasy about, as they were to have been back 6 days ago.




[Clark] 
Friday the 3rd January 1806
 

       At 11 A. m. we were visited by our near neighbour Chief (or Tiá)  [8] Co mo wool alis Conia [NB: Coôné‚] and Six Clat sops.    they brought for Sale Some roots berries and 3 Dogs also a Small quantity of fresh blubber.    this blubber they informed us they had obtained from their neighbours the Cal lá mox who inhabit the coast to the S. E near one of their Villages a Whale had recently perished.    this blubber the Indians eat and esteem it excellent food.    our party from necescity have been obliged to Subsist Some length of time on dogs have now become extreamly fond of their flesh; it is worthey of remark that while we lived principally on the flesh of this animal we wer much more helthy Strong and more fleshey then we have been Sence we left the Buffalow Country.    as for my own part I have not become reconsiled to the taste of this animal as yet.    a Small Crow, the blue Crested Corvus and the Smaller Corvus with a white breast, the little brown ren, and a large brown Sparrow, the bald Eagle, and the butifull Buzzard of the Columbia Still Continue with us,  [9] Send Sarjt. Gass and G. Shannon to the Salt makers who are on the Sea Coast to the S, W of us, to enquire after Willard & Wiser who have not yet returned. R. Field, potts & Collins the hunters who Set out on the 28th ulto. returned this evening after dark.    they reported that they had been about 15 miles up the river which falls into Meriwethers Bay to the East of us,  [10] and had hunted the Country a considerable distance to East, and had proved unsucksesfull haveing killed one Deer and a fiew fowls, bearly as much as Subsisted them.    this reminded us of the necessity of takeing time by the forelock, and keep out several parties while we have yet a little meat before hand. Capt Lewis gave the Cheif Cania a par of Sattin breechies with which he appeared much pleased.—




[Ordway] 
 

       Friday 3rd Jany. 1806.    hard Thunder hail and rain the greater part of last night    one of the hunters caught a large otter. Sergt. Gass went over to the Salt Camps, about 10 oClock a number of the natives  [11] came to the fort.    in the evening three of our hunters  [12] came to the Fort    had killed nothing but one Deer one Swan and 4 ducks, also a raven which they eat on new years day to Satisfy their hunger.—




[Gass] 
 

       Friday 3rd.    The weather is still cloudy and wet. I set out this morning with one of the men  [13] to go to the salt-works, to see what progress those engaged in that business had made; and why some of them had not returned, as they had been expected for some time. We proceeded along a dividing ridge,  [14] expecting to pass the heads of some creeks, which intervened. We travelled all day and could see no game; and the rain still continued. In the evening we arrived at a place where two of the men had killed an elk some time ago.  [15] Here we struck up a fire, supped upon the marrow-bones and remained all night.




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Friday Janry 3rd    We had hard thunder, hail & Rain the greater part of last night, & light showers of rain this morning; Two of our Men left the fort to go out hunting.    Serjeant Gass went over to the Ocean in order to go to the Camp where some of our party 〈are〉 were making Salt.    About 10 o'Clock A. M. a number of Indians  [16] came to our Fort on a visit; they belonged to the Clatsop nation.    In the Evening three of our hunters  [17] returned to the Fort, & had killed 1 Deer, 1 Swan, 2 Geese 4 Ducks & a Raven.    The Raven they had eaten on New Years day, & the remainder of the Game they brought in with them, but mentioned they had seen no Elk.    One of our hunters caught an Otter during last night.




 

1. In Chinookan the term is tia. In the Chinook jargon it is táyi which is borrowed from the Nootkan word ta·yi,; all mean "chief." (Return to text.)

 

2. The Tillamooks; the direction should be southwest. (Return to text.)

 

3. Probably the northwestern crow, Corvus caurinus [AOU, 489], a new species. See also March 3, 1806. Cutright (LCPN), 273, 432; Holmgren, 29. Perhaps it was Biddle who drew a red vertical line through this passage about birds. (Return to text.)

 

4. Probably the gray jay; see above, December 18, 1805. (Return to text.)

 

5. Perhaps the winter wren. (Return to text.)

 

6. Possibly the golden-crowned sparrow, Zonotrichia atricapilla [AOU, 557]. Burroughs, 258. The fox sparrow, Passerella iliaca [AOU, 585], has also been suggested. Holmgren, 33. (Return to text.)

 

7. In Roman mythology Opportunity, or Time (Saturn), was represented as having hair on the front of the head, but being bald behind. The expression has been used by Rabelais, Spenser, and Shakespeare. (Return to text.)

 

8. Perhaps it was Biddle who added the red-inked parentheses around "or Tiá." (Return to text.)

 

9. Biddle may have drawn the red vertical line through this passage about birds. (Return to text.)

 

10. Youngs River, Clatsop County, Oregon. Atlas map 82. (Return to text.)

 

11. Including Coboway and six other Clatsops, according to Lewis and Clark. (Return to text.)

 

12. Reubin Field, Collins, and Potts, according to Lewis and Clark, but Potts was not included in Clark's enumeration of December 28. (Return to text.)

 

13. Shannon, according to Clark. (Return to text.)

 

14. Gass's account of his journey to the saltworks is not altogether clear, no directions or names being given, but the dividing ridge must be the high ground between Lewis and Clark River and the coast, Clatsop County, Oregon. Various small streams run from the ridge toward the river, and it was the heads of these he hoped to clear, apparently without success. He was going generally south, and west toward the coast. (Return to text.)

 

15. Somewhere along the ridge in Clatsop County, probably north of Cullaby Creek. (Return to text.)

 

16. Including Coboway and six other Clatsops, report Lewis and Clark. (Return to text.)

 

17. Reubin Field, Collins, and Potts, but Potts was not included in Clark's list of December 28. (Return to text.)












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