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[Lewis] 
Monday [NB: Sunday] January 26th 1806.
 

       Werner and Howard who were sent for salt on the 23rd have not yet returned, we are apprehensive that they have missed their way; neither of them are very good woodsmen, and this thick heavy timbered pine country added to the constant cloudy weather makes it difficult for even a good woodsman to steer for any considerable distance the course he wishes.    we ordered Collins to return early in the morning and rejoin the salt makers, and gave him some small articles of merchandize to purchase provisions from the Indians, in the event of their still being unfortunate in the chase. The Shallun [NB: See Febry. 8 1806]  [1] or deep purple berry is in form much like the huckkleberry and terminates bluntly with a kind of cap or cover at the end like that fruit; they are attatched seperately to the sides of the boughs of the shrub by a very short stem hanging underneath the same and are frequently placed very near each other on the same bough; it is a full bearer.    the berry is easily geathered as it seperates from the bough readily, while the leaf is strongly affixed. the shrub which produces this fruit rises to the hight of 6 or 8 feet sometimes grows on the high lands but moste generally in the swampy or marshey grounds; it is an evergreen.    the stem or trunk is from three to 10 Inches in circumference irregularly and much branched, seldom more than one steem proceding from the same root, tho' they are frequently associated very thickly.    the bark is somewhat rough and of a redish brown colour.    the wood is very firm and hard.    the leaves are alternate declining and attatched by a short fotstalk to the two horizontal sides of the boughs; the form is a long oval, reather more accute towards its apex than at the point of insertion; it's margin slightly serrate, it's sides colapsing or partially foalding upwards or channelled; it is also thick firm [s]mothe and glossey, the upper surface of a fine deep green, while the under disk is of a pale or whiteish green.    this shrub retains it's virdure very perfectly during the winter and is a beautifull shrub.—    the natives either eat these berrys when ripe immediately from the bushes or dryed in the sun or by means of their sw[e]ating kilns; very frequently they pound them and bake then in large loaves of 10 of fifteen pounds; this bread keeps very well during one season and retains the most jeucies of the fruit much better than by any other method of preservation.    this bread is broken and stired in could water until it be sufficiently thick and then eaten; in this way the natives most generally use it.—




[Clark] 
Tuesday [EC: Sun] 26th of January 1806
 

       We order Collins to return early in the morning and join the Salt makers, and gave him Some Small articles of merchendize to purchase Some provisions from the indians in the event of their Still being unfortunate in the chase.

 

       The [NB: Shal-lun]  [2] or deep purple berry is in form much like the huckleberry and termonate bluntly with a kind of Cap or cover at the end like that fruit; they are attached Seperately to the Sides of the boughes of the shrub by a very Short Stem ganging under neath the Same, and are frequently placed verry near each other on the Same bough it is a full bearer; the berry is easily gathered as it Seperates from the bough, readily, while the leaf is Strongly affixed.    the Shrub which produces this fruit rises to the hight of 6 or 8 feet Sometimes grows on high lands but most frequently in Swampy or marshey grounds; it is an ever green.    the Stem or trunk is from 3 to 10 inches in circumferance irrigularly and much branches, Seldom more than one Stem proceeding from the Same root, tho they are frequently associated very thickly.    the bark is Somewhat rough and of a redish brown Colour.    the wood is very firm and hard.    the leaves are alternate declining and attachd by a Short fotstalk to the two horizontal Sides of the bough's; the form is a long oval, reather more accute towards its apex that at the point of insertion; it's Sides partially folding upwards; or Channeled, it is also thick 〈firm and〉 Smothe and glossy, the upper Surfice of a fine deep green, while the under disk is of a pale or whiteish green.    this Shrub retains its verdure verry perfectly dureing the winter and is a butifull Shrub—.    the nativs either eate those berries ripe imediately from the bushes, or dried in the Sun or by means of the Swetting kiln; verry frequently they pound them and bake them in large loaves 10 or 15 pounds weight; this bread keeps verry well dureing one Season and retains the most jouicies of the frute much better than any other method of preperation. The bread is broken and Stured in Coald water untill it be Sufficiently thik and then eaten, in this way the nativ's most generally use it—.—.




[Ordway] 
 

       Sunday 26th Jany. 1806.    considerable of Snow fell in the course of last night and continues this morning, and cold freezing weather    the Snow is this evening about 5 Inches deep on a level.—




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Sunday Janry 26th    during last night we had considerable Snow & it continued Snowing this morning.    the weather was cold & freezing & the Snow lay on the ground during this day 5 Inches deep on a level    It continued Snowing 'till the Evening.    The Men in the fort were all employed 〈at the Fort〉 in dressing leather, making Moccasins &ca.—




 

1. As Biddle notes in the emendation, Lewis describes the true "shullon," or salal, on February 8, 1806. The plant described here is evergreen huckleberry, Vaccinium ovatum Pursh, another species discovered by the expedition. Hitchcock et al., 4:34; Gunther (EWW), 44; Cutright (LCPN), 261 n. 19, 274–74, 422. (Return to text.)

 

2. The original word here has been replaced by Biddle's red-inked emendation. The first few lines of the paragraph have a red vertical line drawn through, perhaps Biddle's work. (Return to text.)












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