previous   |   next

[Lewis] 
Tuesday [NB: Monday] January 27th 1806.
 

       This morning Collins set out for the Salt works.    in the evening Shannon returned and reported that himself and party had killed ten Elk. he left Labuche and R. fields with the Elk.    two of those Elk he informed us were at the distance of nine miles from this place near the top of a mountain, that the rout by which they mus be brought was at least four miles by land through a country almost inaccessible from the fallen timber, brush and sink-holes, which were now disgused by the snow; we therefore concluded to relinquish those two Elk for the present, and ordered every man who could be speared from the fort to go early in the morning in surch of the other eight.

 

       Goodrich has recovered from the Louis veneri which he contracted from an amorous contact with a Chinnook damsel. I cured him as I did Gibson last winter by the uce of murcury.  [1] I cannot learn that the Indians have any simples which are sovereign specifics in the cure of this disease; and indeed I doubt very much wheter any of them have any means of effecting a perfect cure.    when once this disorder is contracted by them it continues with them during life; but always ends in decipitude, death, or premature old age; tho' from the uce of certain simples together with their diet, they support this disorder with but little inconvenience for many years, and even enjoy a tolerable share of health; particularly so among the Chippeways who I believe to be better skilled in the uce of those simples than any nation of Savages in North America. The Chippeways use a decoction of the root of the Lobelia,  [2] and that of a species of sumac  [3] common to the Atlantic states and to this country near and on the Western side of the Rocky Mountains.    this is the smallest species of the sumac, readily distinguished by it's winged rib, or common footstalk, which supports it's oppositely pinnate leaves.    these decoctions are drank freely and without limitation.    the same decoctions are used in cases of the gonnaerea and are effecatious and sovereign.    notwithstanding that this disorder dose exist among the Indians on the Columbia yet it is witnessed in but fiew individuals, at least the males who are always sufficiently exposed to the observations or inspection of the phisician.    in my whole rout down this river I did not see more than two or three with the gonnaerea and about double that number with the pox.—

 

       The beary which the natives call solme  [4] is the production of a plant about the size and much the shape of that common to the atlantic states which produces the berry commonly called Solloman's seal berry.    this berry also is attatched to the top of the stem in the same manner; and is of a globelar form, consisting of a thin soft pellecle which encloses a soft pulp inveloping from three to four seeds, white, firm, smothe, and in the form of a third or quarter of a globe, and large in proportion to the fruit or about the size of the seed of the common small grape.    this berry when grown and unripe is not speckles as that of the Solomon's seal berry is; this last has only one globular smoth white firm seed in each berry.— the Solme grows in the woodlands among the moss and is an annual plant to all appearance.—




[Clark] 
Wednesday [EC: Mon] 27th January 1806
 

       This morning Collins Set out to the Saltmakers    Shannon returned and reported that himself and party had killed 10 Elk.    he lef Labiech & R Field with the Elk, two of those Elk he informed us was at the distance of 9 miles from this place near the top of a mountain, that the rout by which they must be brought was at least 5 miles by land thro' a Countrey almost inexcessable, from the fallen timber brush, and Sink holes, which were now disguised by the Snow; we therefore Concluded to relinquish those two Elks for the present, and ordered every man that Could be Speared from the Fort to go early in the morning in Serch of the other Eight, which is at no great distance from the Netul river, on which we are. Goudrich has recoverd from the louis veneri which he contracted from a amorous Contact with a Chinnook damsel.    he was Cured as Gibson was with murcury by [blank]  [5]    I cannot lern that the Indians have any Simples Sovereign Specifics in the cure of this disease; indeed I douubt verry much whether any of them have any means of effecting a perfect cure.    when once this disorder is contracted by them it Continues with them dureing life; but always ends in decepitude, death; or premature old age; tho' from the use of certain Simples together with their diet, they Support this disorder with but little inconveniance for maney years, and even enjoy a tolerable Share of health; particularly So among the Chippeways who I believe to be better Skilled in the use of those Simples than any nation of Indians in North America. The Chippaways use a decoction of the root of the Labelia, and that of a Species of Sumac Common to the Atlantic States  [6] and to this countrey near and on the western Side of the Rocky mountains. This is the smallest Specis of Sumake, readily distinguished by it's winged rib, or common footstalk, which Supports it's oppositly pinnate leaves.    these decoctions are drank freely and without limitations. the Same decoctions are used also in cases of the gonnarea and are effecatious and sovereign.    notwithstanding that this disorder does exist among the indians on the Columbia yet it is witnessed in but fiew individuals high up the river, or at least the males who are always Sufficiently exposed to the observation or inspection of the phisician.    in my whole rout down this river I did not See more than two or three with Gonnarea and about doubIe that number with the Pox.—

 

       The berry which the nativs Call Sol me is the production of a plant about the Size and much the Shape of that Common to the atlantic States which produces the berry Commonly Called Sollomons Seal berry  [7]    this berry is also attached to the top of the Stem in the Same manner; and is of a globular form Consisting of a thin Soft Pellicle rine which encloses a Soft Pellicle pulp inveloping from 3 to 4 Seed, white firm, Smothe, and in the form of a third or a quarter of a Globe, and large in perportion to the fruit, or about the Size of the Seed of the Common Small grape.    the berry when grown and unripe is not Specked as the Solomon's seal Berry is; this last haveing only one Globaler Smothe, ferm, white Seed in each berry—.    the Sol me grows in the wood lands amonge the moss and on the high ridges.    and is an annual plant to all appearance.—.




[Ordway] 
 

       Monday 27th Jany. 1806.  [8]    froze hard last night    a clear cold morning.    one man  [9] Set out to hunt for the Salt makers    about noon George Shannon came to the Fort and informed us that he had killed five Elk and informed us that R. Feilds had killed three Elk and Labuche 2 Elk.—    but Some of them too far to pack in.




[Gass] 
 

       Monday 27th.    This was a clear cold frosty morning, and the snow about 9 inches deep. Where the sun shone on it during the day, a considerable quantity of it melted; but these places were few, as the whole face of the country near this is closely covered with fir timber. In the afternoon a hunter  [10] came in and informed us that the party he had been with had killed ten elk.




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Monday Janry 27th    It froze hard during last night, & this morning was clear & cold.    One of our hunters  [11] was sent out, to hunt in order to supply the Men with Meat at the Camp where they are making Salt & 2 of our party 〈was sent〉 who went out in Order to go to that place on the 23d instant, had not as yet returned.—    About noon one of our hunters  [12] that had been out hunting returned to the fort.    he informed us that he had killed 5 Elk & that another of the hunters had killed 3 Elk, & that another of the party had also killed two Elk but that these last were killed at a long distance from the Fort.




 

1. There is apparently some question whether Lewis could be said to have cured syphilis by using mercury. Six months later (see Lewis's entry for July 2, 1806), Goodrich and McNeal were exhibiting symptoms of the seondary stage of the disease. Goodrich, McNeal, and Gibson were among the expedition members Clark listed as dead some twenty years later, but since some fifteen had died in all, it seems unwise to make any conclusions about the unrecorded causes of the deaths of the three. Cutright (LCPN), 254–56; Chuinard (OOMD), 264–65; Clark's List (ca. 1825–28), Jackson (LLC), 2:638–39. The "Louis veneri" is lues venerea, Latin for syphilis. (Return to text.)

 

2. Blue cardinal-flower, Lobelia siphilitica L., Fernald, 1355. (Return to text.)

 

3. Dwarf sumac, Thus copallina L., an eastern species that reaches its western limit in eastern Kansas and southeast Nebraska. Barkley, 223; Fernald, 977. (Return to text.)

 

4. It is either Smilacina stellata (L.) Desf. (Coues's S. sessilifolia), with dark blue or green berries and blue stripes, or S. racemosa (L.) Desf., having red berries with small purple spots, both called false Solomon's seal. The plant is compared to Solomon's seal, Polygonatum biflorum Ell., a species in the East. Hitchcock et al., 1:800–801; Bailey, 212–13; Coues (HLC), 3:826 n. 12. See above, November 13, 1805, for a discussion of the term "solme." (Return to text.)

 

5. The lines about Goodrich have a red vertical line through them, perhaps drawn by Biddle. (Return to text.)

 

6. Again a red vertical line from "The Chippaways" to about here. (Return to text.)

 

7. Another red vertical line from the beginning of this paragraph to about here. (Return to text.)

 

8. Ordway left a portion of the page blank after this entry and began his next entry at the top of a new page. (Return to text.)

 

9. Collins again, say Lewis and Clark. (Return to text.)

 

10. Shannon, according to Lewis, Clark, and Ordway. (Return to text.)

 

11. Collins again. (Return to text.)

 

12. Shannon, according to Lewis, Clark, and Ordway. (Return to text.)












previous   |   next


Home  |  Search  |  Read the Journals  |  Additional Texts  |  Images  |  Maps  |  Multimedia
About This Project |  FAQ  |  Links  |  Print Editions  |  Copyright  |  Contact Us  |  Site Map