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[Lewis] 
Friday March 21st 1806.  [1]
 

       As we could not set out we thought it best to send out some hunters and accordingly dispatched Sheilds and Collins on this side the Netul for that purpose with orders to return in the evening or sooner if they were successfull. The hunters returned late in the evening unsucessfull.    we have not now more than one day's provision on hand.    we directed Drewyer and the Feildses to set out tomorrow morning early, and indevour to provide us some provision on the bay beyond point William. we were visited to day by some Clatsop indians who left us in the evening.    our sick men Willard and bratton do not seem to recover; the former was taken with a violent pain in his leg and thye last night. Bratton is now so much reduced that I am somewhat uneasy with rispect to his recovery; the pain of which he complains most seems to be seated in the small of his back and remains obstinate. I beleive that it is the rheumatism with which they are both afflicted.—




[Clark] 
Friday March 21st 1806
 

       as we could not Set out we thought it best to Send out Some hunters and accordingly dispatched Shields and Collins on this Side of the Netul for that purpose with orders to return in the evening or Sooner if they were Successfull.    they returned late in the evening unsuccessfull.    we have not now more than two days provisions on hand.    we derected Drewyer and the two Fieldses to Set out tomorrow morning early, and indevour to provide us Some provision on the Bay beyond point William. we were visited to day by Some Clatsops who left us in the evening.    our sick men Willard and Bratten do not Seem to recover; the former was taken with a violent pain in his leg and thye last night. Bratten is now so much reduced that I am Somewhat uneasy with respect to his recovery; the pain of which he complains most Seems to be Settled in the Small of his back and remains obstenate. I believe that it is the Rheumatism with which they are both affected.—.




[Ordway] 
 

       Friday 21st March 1806.    rained hard all last night, and continues this morning.    a number of natives visited us with Some dryed Small fish to trade which they call in their language oll-can.  [2]    we bought a fiew from them.




[Gass] 
 

       Friday 21st.    We had a cloudy wet morning. Two of the hunters  [3] went out this morning; and about 10 o'clock we were visited by some of the Clat- sop Indians. These, and the Chin-ook, Cath-la-mas, Cal-a-mex,  [4] and Chiltz  [5] nations, who inhabit the seacoast, all dress in the same manner. The men are wholly naked, except a small robe; the women have only the addition of the short petticoat. Their language also is nearly the same; and they all observe the same ceremony of depositing with the remains of the dead all their property, or placing it at their graves. I believe I saw as many as an hundred canoes at one burying-place of the Chin-ooks, on the north side of the Columbia, at its entrance into Hailey's Bay: and there are a great many at the burying-place of every village. These Indians on the coast have no horses, and very little property of any kind, except their canoes. The women are much inclined to venery, and like those on the Missouri are sold to prostitution at an easy rate. An old Chin-ook squaw  [6] frequently visited our quarters, with nine girls which she kept as prostitutes. To the honour of the Flatheads,  [7] who live on the west side of the Rocky Mountains, and extend some distance down the Columbia, we must mention them as an exception; as they do not exhibit those loose feelings of carnal desire, nor appear addicted to the common customs of prostitution: and they are the only nation on the whole route where any thing like chastity is regarded. In the evening our two hunters  [8] returned, but had killed nothing.




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Friday March 21st    It rained hard all last night & contined the same this morning.    The Natives came to the Fort & brought some dried fish, which the Indians called All-Can,  [9] we purchased some of these fish from them.    We are all employed in getting things still in readiness in Order to return.—




 

1. Here begin the daily entries in Lewis's Codex K that go to May 23, 1806. Preceding the entry on the flyleaf are the following words written in pencil upside down to the rest of the journal writing: Cohalo, Yeh-whal-te, Nerhe-e-ear. The writer is not known. (Return to text.)

 

2. The captains wrote it "ol-then," a Chinookan term, ú-łx̣an, for dried eulachon; see Lewis's entry of March 25. (Return to text.)

 

3. Shields and Collins, say the captains. (Return to text.)

 

4. Tillamook Indians. (Return to text.)

 

5. The Salish-speaking Lower Chehalis, living on the Washington coast in Grays Harbor and Pacific counties, from Grays Harbor south to Willapa Bay. (Return to text.)

 

6. The wife of Delashelwilt; see the captains' entries for March 15. Gass, like other whites, could only see the custom he was describing as commercial prostitution, without realizing it might serve a social and even a spiritual purpose for the Indians. See Clark's entries of October 12, 1804, and January 5, 1805. In this instance, to be sure, the commercial element may have been more prominent. (Return to text.)

 

7. Probably referring to the Nez Perces and to other Shahaptian-language people on the Snake and Columbia rivers encountered by the party on their westward journey. McKeehan's reflections echo those attached to Gass's entry of April 5, 1805. (Return to text.)

 

8. Shields and Collins, as the captains note. (Return to text.)

 

9. The captains wrote it "ol-then," a Chinookan term, ú-łx̣an for dried eulachon; see Lewis's entry of March 25. (Return to text.)












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