previous   |   next

[Lewis] 
Sunday March 23rd 1806.  [1]
 

       Half after 9 A. M. Colter arrived, having killed one Elk but so distant that we could not send for the meat and get arround Point William  [2] today, we therefore prefered seting out and depending on Drewyer and the hunters  [3] we have sent forward for meat.    the wind is pretty high but it seems to be the common opinion that we can pass point William.    we accordingly distributed the baggage and directed the canoes to be launched and loaded for our departure.—    at 1 P.M. we bid a final adieu to Fort Clatsop.    we had not proceeded more than a mile before we met Delashelwilt and a party of 20 Chinnooks men and women.  [4]    this Cheif leaning that we were in want of a canoe some days past, had brought us one for sale, but being already supplyed we did not purchase it.  [5]    I obtained one Sea Otter  [6] skin from this party.   at a ¼ before three we had passed Meriwethers bay  [7] and commenced coasting the difficult shore; at ½ after five we doubled point William, and at 7 arrived in the mouth of a small creek  [8] where we found our hunters.    they had killed 2 Elk,  [9] at the distance of a mile & ½.    it was too late to send after it this evening.    we therefore encamped on the Stard side of the Creek.    the wind was not very hard.—

 

        (Image not available due to copyright restrictions.) 




[Clark] 
Sunday 23rd March 1806  [10]
 

       This morning proved So raney and uncertain that we were undeturmined for Some time whether we had best Set out & risque the [river?] which appeared to be riseing or not.    Jo. Colter returned haveing killed an Elk about 3 miles towards Point Adams.    the rained Seased and it became fair about Meridean, at which time we loaded our Canoes & at 1 P. M. left Fort Clatsop on our homeward bound journey.    at this place we had wintered and remained from the 7th of Decr. 1805 to this day and have lived as well as we had any right to expect, and we can Say that we were never one day without 3 meals of Some kind a day either pore Elk meat or roots, not withstanding the repeeted fall of rain which has fallen almost Constantly Since we passed the long narrows on the [blank] of Novr. last  [11]    indeed w[e] have had only [blank] days fair weather since that time. Soon after we had Set out from Fort Clatsop we were met by De lash el wilt & 8 men of the Chinnooks, and Delashelwilts wife the old boud and his Six Girls, they had, a Canoe, a Sea otter Skin, Dried fish and hats for Sale, we purchased a Sea otter Skin, and proceeded on, thro' Meriwethers Bay, there was a Stiff breese from the S. W. which raised Considerable Swells around Meriwethers point  [12] which was as much as our Canoes Could ride.    above point William we came too at the Camp of Drewyer & the 2 Field's.    they had killed 2 Elk which was about 1½ miles distant.    here we Encampd. for the night having made 16 miles.




[Ordway] 
 

       Sunday 23rd March 1806.  [13]    the one hunter stayed out last night rained hard the greater part of last night.  [14]   this morning proved so rainy and uncertain that our officers were undetermined for Some time whether they had best Set out & risque the [wind?] which appeared to be riseing or not. John Colter returned having killed an Elk about 3 miles towards point adams.  [15]    the rain Seased and it became fair about meridian at which time we loaded our canoes & at 1 P. M. left Fort Clatsop on our homeward bound journey.    at this place we had wintered and remained from the 7th of Decr. 1805 to this day, and have lived as well as we had any right to expect, and we can Say that we were never one day without 3 meals of Some kind a day, either poor Elk meat or roots, notwithstanding the reputed fall of rain which has fallen almost continualy Since we passed the long narrows on the [blank] of Novr last, indeed we have had only [blank] days fair weather Since that time. Soon after we had set out from fort Clatsop we were met by a party of the Chinooks,  [16] the old baud and hir Six Girls, they had a canoe, a Sea otter Skin dryed fish & hats for Sale.    we purchased a Sea otter and proceeded on thro Meriwethers Bay.    their was a stiff breeze from the S. W. which raised considerable Swells around Merewethers Point,  [17] which was as much as our canoes could ride    above point william we came too at the Camp of G. Drewyer & the 2 Fields    they had killed 2 Elk which was about 1½ mile distant.    here we Encamped  [18] for the night, having made 16 miles.—




[Gass] 
 

       Sunday 23d.    There was a cloudy wet morning.— The hunter  [19] who remained out last night, came in early, and had killed an elk. We were employed this forenoon in dividing and packing up our loading; and distributing it among the canoes, which were five in number, three large and two small. At noon, we put it on board; and at 1 o'clock, left fort Clatsop. The afternoon was fair. We proceeded round Point William, went about 19 miles, and encamped at the mouth of a creek, where we found the three hunters  [20] that had been sent on a-head, and who had killed two elk about a mile and an half distant.




[Whitehouse] 
 

       Sunday March 23d    It rained very hard, during the whole of last night.    One of our hunters did not return to the fort during that time; This morning it still continued raining, & the Weather appeared very uncertain.    Our Officers were undetermined, whether they would set out, on our homeward bound Voyage; or not.    About 9 o'Clock A. M., the hunter that had staid out during last night, returned to the Fort; he had killed one Elk, which he mention'd, he had left about 3 Miles from the Fort, towards Point Adams.    About 12 o'Clock A. M. it ceased raining; & the weather became Clear & pleasant, & we loaded our Canoes, & got every thing in readiness to ascend the Columbia River.    We have been at Fort Clatsop from the 7th day of December last past; and our party had lived as well, 〈as they〉 as could be expected, & can say that they never were, without 3 Meals each day, of some kind of food, either Elk meat, Roots, fish &ca. notwithstanding the repeated rainey Weather; which fell (with a few days intermission) ever since, we passed the long Narrows of Columbia River; which was the 2nd of November last past.—    Fort Clatsop is situated on the South side of Columbia River, and about 1½ Miles up a small River (which empties itself into the Columbia River) called by the Natives Ne-tul, and lay a small distance back, from the West bank of said River.    The fort was built in the form of an oblong Square, & the front of it facing the River, was picketed in, & had a Gate on the North & one on the South side of it.    The distance from the head waters of the So fork of the Columbia River; (〈or〉 Kiomenum or Lewis's River), to fort Clatsop is 994 Miles, (this being the fork which we descended) & from the Mouth of the River de Bois 4134 Miles, the place from whence we took our departure, 〈& in〉 Latitude 46° 19' 11 1/10S North, The River Columbia at its mouth also, lay:    in Latitude 46° 19' 11 1/10S North, & Longitude 124° 57' 0 1/10S West from Greenwich; & is 21 Miles wide from Cape disappointment on the No side, to Point Adams on So. side of the River; which is where the Columbia River enters into the Western or pacific Ocean.    the Tide rises & falls, about 8 feet at the small River, 〈on〉 near which was built Fort Clatsop.    We have been 60 Miles from Cape disappointment (Where the Chin-ook Indian village lays) which is on the No. side of the River & or its entrance into the Ocean to the No. North West.    The two points, Cape disappointment, & point Adams; lay nearly opposite to each other, & about 10 Miles below fort Clatsop    The distance that we have went to the Mouth of Columbia River; from the River du Bois, from whence we took our departure is 4,144 Miles, fort Adams being the extreme So point, & lay near to where our party made Salt.—    We found that Bands of the flatt head Nation of Indians; are far more numerous that we expected; they extending from the head waters of the Ki-o-me-num River, to the Mouth of the Columbia River; & to the head of all the Rivers, which runs into the No. fork of Columbia River; & to the head of the same.    This information we received from numbers of Indians belonging to the different bands of that Nation.—    They are called flatt heads from the custom they have among them, of binding flatt pieces of wood, on the foreheads, & back parts of the heads of their Children, when born, which occasions their foreheads & back part of their heads to be flatt.—    End of first Volume.  [21]

 

       Sunday March 23d  [22]    At 1 o'Clock P. M. we embarked, on board our Canoes from Fort Clatsop, on our homeward bound Voyage.    We proceeded on up the South side of the Columbia River, when we were met by a party of the Chin-ook tribe of Indians,  [23] who belong to the Flatt head nation.    These Indians were in Canoes, & were on their way to Fort Clatsop in Order to trade with us; they had with them a Canoe & a Sea Otter Skin, which they Intended trading with us.    We halted a short time, & Captain Lewis purchased the Sea Otter skin from them.    We then continued on our Voyage, and went round a point of land called by our officers Merryweather point (the Sirname of Captain Lewis) when the wind rose & blew hard from the South West, & the waves ran very high.    We proceeded on, & passed another point of land called point William by our officers the Sirname of Captain Clark.    We halted a short distance above this last point, at a Camp where the two hunters  [24] that were sent on ahead of us were.    These two hunters had killed 2 Elk, which they informed us lay 1½ Miles from this place.    We encamped at that place having come 16 Miles this day.—




 

1. The party departs for home on this date. Since they were traveling over country already traversed on the westward journey, they did not record the detailed courses and distances characteristic of earlier writing. Lewis indicates on March 26 that they relied at first on their estimated mileages from the previous year in calculating distance on the return up the Columbia. Some days only one or neither of the men gives mileages for the day, and when both do there are sometimes discrepancies, which are not themselves consistent. (Return to text.)

 

2. Present Tongue Point, Clatsop County, Oregon. (Return to text.)

 

3. The Field brothers, Joseph and Reubin. (Return to text.)

 

4. His name is Chinookan [i]tlaS with caron lowercase symbolx with dot below lowercase symbolilwilt, meaning unknown. See March 15, 1806. The Chinook Indians are discussed at November 15, 1805. (Return to text.)

 

5. They were already supplied because they had stolen a canoe on March 18, 1806. See March 17 and further reference to this canoe on March 24. (Return to text.)

 

6. Sea otter, Enhydra lutris. (Return to text.)

 

7. Now Youngs Bay, Clatsop County. See November 29, 1805. (Return to text.)

 

8. "Ke ke mar que Creek" on Atlas map 82; present John Day River in Clatsop County. See note at November 27, 1805. They camped just below the mouth of the stream and east of their camp of the previous November before selecting the Fort Clatsop site. The night's campsite was close to the Ivy Station archaeological site, where occupation began around 1,300 years ago and continued into historic times. Minor (ASCR). (Return to text.)

 

9. Elk, or more properly, wapiti, Cervus elaphus. (Return to text.)

 

10. Only one line at the end of this entry is carried over to a page that is otherwise blank. (Return to text.)

 

11. In fact, they passed the Long Narrows, part of The Dalles of the Columbia River, on October 25, 1805. (Return to text.)

 

12. Presumably Smith Point, the present location of Astoria, Clatsop County. (Return to text.)

 

13. From this point to the end of this notebook Ordway's writing gets smaller and he adds more lines to each page. (Return to text.)

 

14. From this point to the end of the entry Ordway copies Clark nearly word for word. (Return to text.)

 

15. Point Adams at the mouth of the Columbia River, Clatsop County, Oregon. (Return to text.)

 

16. Delashelwilt, his wife, and her train. (Return to text.)

 

17. Astoria, Clatsop County. (Return to text.)

 

18. Just below the mouth of John Day River, the captains' Kekemarque Creek, Clatsop County. (Return to text.)

 

19. Colter. (Return to text.)

 

20. Drouillard and the Field brothers. (Return to text.)

 

21. In this notebook there are several remaining pages, so the note could refer to the end of a volume in the original journal. It could be also that the copyist sees a new beginning with the party's departure from Fort Clatsop this day. (Return to text.)

 

22. Here begins another portion of the fair copy of Whitehouse's journal. It is introduced by the following words: "Volume 2nd Journal of a Voyage from Fort Clatsop, on the River Netul, one of the Rivers that empties itself into the Columbia River, across the Continent of North America, to Saint Louis in the Territory of Louisiana; under the direction of Captains Merryweather Lewis, & William Clark, & patronized by the Government of the United States by Joseph Whitehouse." (Return to text.)

 

23. Including Delashelwilt and "the old baud and hir Six girls," as Ordway puts it. (Return to text.)

 

24. Actually three, Drouillard and the Field brothers. (Return to text.)












previous   |   next


Home  |  Search  |  Read the Journals  |  Additional Texts  |  Images  |  Maps  |  Multimedia
About This Project |  FAQ  |  Links  |  Print Editions  |  Copyright  |  Contact Us  |  Site Map