undated, ca. January 21, 1804
12.85% Complete
Aug 30, 1803 Sep 30, 1806

undated, ca. January 21, 1804

 
1804 mes months days
From Dubois to the Manden Nation 1500 miles at
10 mes. pr Day will be 150 days    Viz: May
June, July Augt. & Sept.—


1500 in


  5


  0
From Do. at 12 mes. pr. day—125 days    Viz:
May June July Augt. & 5 days in Septr
 
  4

  5
1[st] Winter      
From Mandens to the rock mountains is 12° W.
at 41 mes. [to a degree of longitude] Say 900
miles at 10 pr Day is 90 Days, Viz: Septr.
Octr. Novr. & 4 Ds



900 in



  3



  0
From Same at 12 miles pr Day    65 Days    Septr.
Octr & 19 of Novr
 
  2

15
From the mountains to the Ocean in Longtd.
123° W say 10° at 41 miles to a degree of
Longtd. add the windings 650 miles at 10
miles will take May June and July, [85?] Days



650 in



  3



  0
From the Same place at 12 ms. 54 days, May &
June
 
  2

[5?]
The time to the Ocean @ 10 ms per Day   11 0 days
The Time @ 12 ms. pr day     8 20 days
1805      
(Delay 15 days)      
Returning from the Ocean to the river 650 miles
@ 10 ms. pr Day is 65 days    Viz: 15 in
August, Septr. 20 in Octr.


650 m


  2


  5
do—    Viz 〈to Mandens 900 m〉 in 65 Days m at
12 m pr Day 54 Day, 15 July
Augt. 9 in Septr
 

  1


24
ditto to the Mandens @ 20 ms pr. Day 45 Days
Septr. Octr—

900

  1

21
ditto @ to the mouth Nov. & Dec @ [blank]     2   0
Returning to the Mandan @ 10 pr     3 26
do    do    at 12 do     3 15
  Months
to Mandens
Months
to mountains
Months
to ocean
Time [word illegible]
lost winter &c.
Total Time
 
at 10
at 12
10 or 12 miles return
Ds
5 0
4 5
2 0
D
3   0
2 15
1 15
 
2 0
2 0
2 5
 
5 28
5 12
0   0
  month Day    
= 15 28 } Total going
out [2]
= 14   2
=   5 25   Total
returning
(say to Decr
1805[)]
Total 19 27   at 12 miles
pr. Day
progression
Total 21 23   at 10 miles
pr. Day
progression
〈If 36 men including Drewyer[3]
〈Big boat 24〉 〈12〉
  〈25〉
2 of us  
1 Sevt.  
2 Intprs= 5
If we take 37 men
The Boat of   25 men
1 Pierogue     6
1 do—     6
  37
If the party to consist of 30 men
Boat of   24 men
1 Periogue of     6
  30
If the Party to Consist of 25 men all in the Boat of 20 ores
If 40 men
Boat of   26
1 Perogue—     8
1 do—     6
  40
If 50 men
Boat   26 men
1 Perog.   10
1    do     7
1    do—     7
  50

〈Those Numbers will Depend on the probability of an oppisition from roving Parties of Bad Indians which it is probable may be on the [R.? blot]〉

Defined the word Sense [4]

It is a faculty of the Soul, whereby it perceived external Objects, by means of the impressions they make on certain organs of the body. These organs are Commonly reconed 5, Viz: the Eyes, whereby we See objects; the ear, which enables us to hear sounds; the nose, by which we receive the Ideas of different smells; the Palate, by which we judge of tastes; and the Skin, which enables us to feel—the different, forms, hardness, or Softness of bodies. [5]

2 men takes up 3 feet { Boat 31 feet in Hol[d] } Inches    
    do 14 do on Cabn. 32 Long } a [Bench or Bank?]
    do 8—4 wide 22 wide
  foot In    
Lockers, must be  
  2 6 wide }


156 foot of Plant @ [word illegible, per-
haps a space and abbreviation for weight
]
pr. foot is [perhaps a space and abbrevia-
tion for weight
]
do—&—  
31 feet Long
do. about—  
  1— 6 Deep
Lockers on the Cabin  
14—0—long } 84 feet
do wide  
   3—0—wide
do
        
   3—0—Deep

Sketches of the Keelboat, ca. January 21, 1804, Field Notes, reverse of document 7
Beinecke Library, Yale University

Ends & Divisions &c. &c. &c.   60
  300
Calculate ¼  
for Season[ing] & wast   75
  375
a Jointed Mast to let down of 32 feet long [6]
1 1 1 [ridge] poles for an Orning
2 2 2 [for]ks to hold the ridge pole of 5 ½ foot abv Deck
3 3 3 [Base with an eye?] to hold the poles to stretch the Orning 3 foot
    4 the Joint of the Mast & hook for it to Lay in
T[his?] is pins to row by

as examples are necessary [7]

Supposeing the party to Consist of 2 Intptrs 4 Non Comd. officers and 21 men and the rules to be observed is Strictly such as Cap. L & C shall from time establish, and a violiation or Disobediance shall be Subject to Such punishment as derected by the articles of War, in like Cases and Such other punishments, as Shall be inflicted by the Sentence of a Court Martial which 〈Shall〉 are to be formed in the following manner, Viz; one Intptr or Sergt. to act as president and at least 1 n Comd. officers & 5 privates members    The Court to Consist of not less then 7 members, 〈in Capital offenses and〉 at other times when Convenient one of the Capts. will preside at the Court    in that Case the Court will have an addition to their number of a presdt. 〈who will have 2 votes〉 (but in all Cases Capt L. & C doe reserve to themselves the right rudcing N C officers at will of inflicting such punishment as they may thing [think] right agreeable to Law at any time which from the nature of the offence & the good of the Service require it)    This Court will act agreeable to the rules and regulations of the Articles of War and Such others as may be established by the Said Cpt L. & C. from time to time.

1. The following material, at right angles to the main body of writing on the page, represents Clark's attempt to figure the amount of time necessary for the expedition. In hoping for a return by the end of 1805, he seriously underestimated the actual length of the voyage. (back)
2. On these "totals going out" there is quite a bit of overwriting and alteration of figures. (back)
3. In this material, upside down to the main body of writing on the page, Clark again tries to figure the number of men needed and their assignments to the different boats. The "Big boat" is the keelboat. (back)
4. The following paragraph begins the reverse of document 7 (printed upside down in Osgood). It appears to have been copied from some other source, perhaps as an exercise in writing by Clark. (back)
5. Here follow two sketches of the keelboat, which are the most important sources of information about that vessel (see fig. 7). The accompanying numbers are Clark's calculation of the amount of lumber necessary to build lockers on the boat. Other modifications may have been carried out at Camp Dubois during the winter. For further information, see above, August 30, 1803, and sources cited there. (back)
6. A key to the keelboat diagram. Clark drew a figure of the "pins to row by" in place of numbers on the last line. (back)
7. These words and the following paragraph are upside down on this page. In the right-hand corner written diagonally in Clark's hand in different-colored ink from the other writing are two apparently irrelevant jottings: [17°?] 27' 15" [and] Puberty. (back)