January 7, 1805
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Aug 30, 1803 Sep 30, 1806

January 7, 1805

 

a verry Cold clear Day, the Themtr Stood at 22 d below 0 wind N W., the river fell 1 inch    Several indians returned from hunting, one of them the Big White Chef of the Lower Mandan Village, Dined with us, and gave me a Scetch of the Countrey as far as the high mountains, & on the South Side of the River Rejone, [1] he Says that the river rejone recves [NB: receives] 6 Small rivers on the S. Side, & that the Countrey is verry hilley and the greater part Covered with timber, Great numbers of beaver &c.—    the 3 men returned from hunting, they kill'd 4 Deer & 2 wolves, Saw Buffalow a long ways off, I continue to Draw a connected plote from the information of Traders, Indians & my own observation & idea—    from the best information, the Great falls is about [NB?: 800] miles nearly west,— [2]

 

Observed time and distance of ☉'s and ☽'s nearest limbs, with Sextant.    ☉ West.

 
Time
     
Distance
  h    m      s    
A. M. 2    21    —   79°   25'   45"
  "     23    55     "     26    15
  "     25      3     "     26    30
  "     26      3     "     27    —
  "     27    47     "     27    15
  "     29    29     "     28    —
  h    m      s    
P. M. 2    38    12   79°   30'   15"
  "     39    22     "     31    —
  "     40    19     "     31    45
  "     41    36     "     32    15
  "     42    33     "     32    45
  "     43    25     "     33    —
 

Monday 7th Jany.    a clear cold morning    the wind high from N. W.    in the evening the three men returned who had been down the River a hunting.    had killed one wolf which they eat as they had nothing else with them.    they killed also 2 Deer and one buffalo but had Suffered considerable with the cold.

1. Clark was receiving information about the Yellowstone, or Roche Jaune, River. The Canadian trader Ménard (see above, October 25, 1804) claimed to have been on the river some time before 1795 and gave a description of it to Jean Baptiste Truteau. In any case, the French traders of St. Louis had received enough information from Indians before Lewis and Clark's time to have given it a name, perhaps derived from the yellow rocks in the river's upper canyon in present Yellowstone National Park. The information given by Big White was incorporated into "Big White's map," (Atlas maps 31a and 31b) and Clark's 1805 map of the West (Atlas maps 32a, 32b, and 32c). The Great Falls of the Missouri, as the Indians told him, were roughly due west of the Mandan villages. Nasatir (BLC), 2:381; Allen, 173, 242–43, 259 and n. 21. (back)
2. This last sentence has been crossed out in red, apparently by Biddle who may also have added "800" in red to a blank space. (back)
3. Lewis's astronomical observation from Codex O. (back)